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Reader Tip: Case Fan – Free After Rebate + Free Shipping

Homebrew Finds - Mon, 10/13/2014 - 12:46

Thanks to HBF Reader Josh for this tip!

Case cooling fan via TigerDirect.  This is selling for $14.99, with a $14.99 Mail in Rebate + Free Shipping (Today 10/13).  Homebrewer’s have used similar fans for kegerator circulation and for putting together DIY Stir Plates.

Josh Says: “This is a 12V device, so you can use an 12v power adapter to power it. I found a 12v power adapter from a phone on eBay for cheap, and just spliced the wires. It does have LEDs that you can hook up as well if you want to light up the inside of a kegerator. This is a somewhat large item fan, but sits nicely atop my kegs to circulate air. I currently do not have a fan grill/finger guard on it, but do have one on order ($5 from Amazon). It has a very nice airflow amount of 110 CFM @ ~700 rpm”

Check it out – Here

Related:

Tips and Gear for Your Kegerator:

Pinned: Chugger Pump · $19 Grain Scale · Hops from $10.49/lb · BoilerMaker G1

Ends Soon: Free EcoGrowler

Recent Great Deals:

Categories: Beer Blogosphere News

Beer Birthday: Will Meyers

Brookston Beer Bulletin - Mon, 10/13/2014 - 11:50
Today is the birthday of Will Meyers, brewmaster of Cambridge Brewing near Boston, Massachusetts. Will’s a great brewer and an even better human being, one of the nicest in the industry. Join me in wishing Will a very happy birthday. Will, with Kevin and Megan, then also from Cambridge...

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Categories: Beer Blogosphere News

Temperature Probe Place – To Immerse or Not To Immerse?

Homebrew Finds - Mon, 10/13/2014 - 11:34

After my last test on the effects of a recirculating fan on kegerator temperatures (See: Kegerator Beer Line Temperatures & Reducing Foam with a Recirculating Fan), I decided to test the effects of kegerator temperature probe placement.  I went with three configurations: Immersed vs Ambient Non-Immersed vs… Zip Tied to a Beer Can.  Those tests yielded some interesting findings.

Test 1 Zip Tied to a Beer Can:

For this test, the probe was zip-tied to a 14.9 Ounce Can of Beamish Irish Stout.  This is the technique I’ve used for years.  At the time, I wanted something with some mass to help regulate temperature and I didn’t want to have to mess with submerging the probe and the required container of liquid.  For this test, the can was placed close to the wall of my keezer on the compressor hump.  The second probe was immersed in 500 mL of water in a Lab Container.  See the picture in test 2 for more info on placement.

I also placed a ChefAlarm Thermometer & Timer in my keezer – Hands on Review – as another point of reference, giving me an ambient temperature reading.  The ChefAlarm has some great features, including high and low temperature logging.  Those highs and lows are what I used as a reference.

Here are the temperature results for test 1 – zip tied to a can.  The top shows the temperature probe zip tied to a beer can.  The bottom, for comparison, shows an immersed temperature probe.  This method produces and nice clean and reliable reading.

Definitions:

  • High Temp: High temperature in deg F as measured by the primary/controlling probe.
  • Low Temp: Low temperature in deg F as measured by the primary/controlling probe.
  • Variance High to Low:  The variance in deg F between general high and low readings from the primary probe.
  • Cycle Length: Overall length of one typical cooling cycle, measured from high point to high point.
  • ChefAlarm High: Ambient temperature high in deg F as recorded by my ChefAlarm
  • ChefAlarm Low: Ambient temperature low in deg F as recorded by my ChefAlarm
  • ChefAlarm Variance: Variance in deg F between high and low ChefAlarm readings
  • Estimated Freezer Cycle Time: Estimated time that the freezer is running as measured from one high to the following low.
  • Estimated Freezer Time: Hours Per Day:  Estimation of how long my freezer would run in 24 hours based on frequency of cycles and freezer cycle time.

Results Test 1:

  • High Temp: 40.03
  • Low Temp: 37.64
  • Variance High to Low: 2.39
  • Cycle Length: 1 Hour 2 Minutes
  • ChefAlarm High: 42
  • ChefAlarm Low: 34
  • ChefAlarm Variance: 8 degrees
  • Estimated Freezer Cycle Time: 12 Minutes
  • Estimated Freezer Time: Hours Per Day: 4.6

Test 2 Submerged Probe:

Setup: I placed the probe immersed in about 500 mL of water one of my Bel-Art Scienceware 500 mL Polypropylene Lab Containers.  I covered the top with aluminum foil.  I have used these containers since 2011 for a bunch of things including yeast rehydration water (see tips page, tip #1), sample storage and more.  That container was placed in about the same spot as the can used it test 1.  Also Pictured: Eva Dry E-500Hands on Review – to handle kegerator condensation.

Here are the temperature results for test 2 – immersed.  The top shows the immersed temperature probe.  The bottom, for comparison, shows the probe zip tied to a beer can.  Notice the stuttered temperature changes toward the bottom of this cycle.  It doesn’t happen every cycle, but periodically, it also comes close to flat lining.  That period of flat lining can last up to 18 minutes.  The mass of the water makes temperature readings inefficient.  That’s what we want to some degree.  We want some sort of a buffer to give a good representation of temperature without quick swings.  However the stuttering temperature changes along with flat lining, make me think that this method has it’s drawbacks.

Results Test 2:

  • High Temp: 40.19
  • Low Temp: 36.76
  • Variance High to Low: 3.46
  • Cycle Length: 1 Hour 59 Minutes
  • ChefAlarm High: 43
  • ChefAlarm Low: 30
  • ChefAlarm Variance: 13 degrees
  • Estimated Freezer Cycle Time: 25 Minutes
  • Estimated Freezer Time: Hours Per Day: 5

Test 3 Ambient Non-Submerged Probe:

Here are the temperature results for test 3 – ambient, non-submerged.  The top of this graph shows the ambient probe, the bottom, for comparison, shows a probe zip tied to a beer can.  The left most portion of the graph is part of a previous test, disregard that.  The middle portion shows the ambient non-submersed probe with a recirculating fan.  By the way… all previous tests were completed with a fan.  The right portion shows the same test, without the fan.  I’m not reporting those results here.  That test was much as you would expect it to be.  Similar to the fan test, with larger swings and slower cycles.  Thoughts… I was actually impressed with the consistency of the ambient air results.  When I first looked at the graph, I noticed the semi-wild start of the test and I thought… here we go… this one is going to be all over the place.  However, when it settled in, it was very reliable.  It also has good accuracy.  The difference between the zip tied readings and the ambient readings are small.  The downside of this method is how often the freezer kicks on.  This method had the shortest cycle length, by far, at just 27 minutes.  It also had the highest estimated freezer utilization at 5.3 hours per day.

Results Test 3:

  • High Temp: 40.01
  • Low Temp: 36.39
  • Variance High to Low: 3.62
  • Cycle Length: 27 Minutes
  • ChefAlarm High: 39
  • ChefAlarm Low: 35
  • ChefAlarm Variance: 4 degrees
  • Estimated Freezer Cycle Time: 6 Minutes
  • Estimated Freezer Time: Hours Per Day: 5.3

Overall Results:

Here side by side comparisons of key metrics…

The submerged test produced the longest cycle length, by far.  Nearly twice as long as the zip tie test and four times the length of the ambient test.  It had middle of the road temp variances (compared to zip tied) but it’s ChefAlarm (ambient air) test showed a whopping 13 degrees difference.  Those swings are the result of how much time the freezer has to stay on to overcome the mass of the water used in the immersed test.  That mass also causes inconsistent temperature readings and periods of flat lining.

The ambient test produced good accuracy (second best variance and best ChefAlarm ambient air varience) but the short cycle length of 27 minutes means your freezer is kicking on a lot.  That shows up in the estimated freezer hours per day… 5.3 hours, the highest of any method.

I think the zip-tied can approach provides a good middle of the road solution.  It provides the best accuracy, based on it’s 2.39 degree temp variance, has a middle of the road overall cycle length, middle of the road freezer run time and uses the least amount of energy with an estimated 4.6 hours of freezer run time per day.  The can also offers the benefit of not having to mess with containers of water or other liquids.  It’s also easy to move and reposition when cleaning or reconfiguring your kegerator.

Related:

Tips and Gear for Your Kegerator:

Pinned: Chugger Pump · $19 Grain Scale · Hops from $10.49/lb · BoilerMaker G1

Ends Soon: Free EcoGrowler

Recent Great Deals:

Some Additional Notes: These tests are with my equipment.  Your results will vary based on a lot of factors including freezer/refrigerator, temp controller, amount of liquid used, probe placement, etc.  In spite of those variances, I think these tests give you a good general idea about probe placement.  I used a BrewBit Model T, sourced via Kickstarter, to log temperature.  Look for a review of the BrewBit Model T here, if and (hopefully) when it becomes readily available to purchase.

Categories: Beer Blogosphere News

Beer and Wine Filtering Kit – $41.95

Homebrew Finds - Mon, 10/13/2014 - 09:28

Product Description - Here  Use coupon code BEERDEAL to get this discount.

Beer and Wine Filtering Kit FIL40 - $41.95 + Free Shipping with $59 Order

Availability: This is a More Beer Deal of the Day.  Quantities are limited. Check the Deal of the Day section - Here - to see if this is still available.

Also Consider: All Sale and Clearance Items

Pinned: Chugger Pump · $19 Grain Scale · Hops from $10.49/lb · BoilerMaker G1

Ends Soon: Free EcoGrowler

Limited Time…

To celebrate 50,000 likes on Facebook MoreBeer is offering $10 Off a $50 order when you use promo code THANKS50K.  For an exact $50 order, this is a 20% discount!

Check out our past featured MoreBeer Items and our MoreBeer Reviews

Quick Links: Kegs • Great Deal on PBW • Mini Keg Growler • Wort Chillers • Counter Pressure Bottle Filler • All Sale and Clearance Items • Hands On: Speidel Fermenters • Blichmann BoilerMaker G2 Kettles Available • Brewing Pliny the Elder • Free Shipping • BrewMaster Series - Pliny, Firestone Walker, Consecration & More

Recent More Beer Finds:

MoreBeer! Picks:

Categories: Beer Blogosphere News

AIH… Free Shipping on Mills, Mash Tuns and More

Homebrew Finds - Mon, 10/13/2014 - 08:07

Adventures in Homebrewing has a number of free shipping promotions going on right now.  Free Shipping is to the lower 48 states.  Look for the free shipping logo on qualifying items.

Also Consider: All Current Sale Items

Pinned: Chugger Pump · $19 Grain Scale · Hops from $10.49/lb · BoilerMaker G1

Ends Soon: Free EcoGrowler

Recent AIH Finds:

AIH Picks:

Categories: Beer Blogosphere News

Reader Tip: Airtight Grain Storage – $23.88 via Petco

Homebrew Finds - Mon, 10/13/2014 - 07:25

Thanks to HBF Reader “piripiriguete” for this tip!

The Vittles Vault line of stackable containers are very popular for bulk grain storage. They are food grade, airtight and pest proof. They also have a large easy access opening and the ability to stack makes them space efficient.

Petco has a sale going on today that brings the cost of the 40 lb stackable container down to $23.88.  Shipping is free with a $49 order or There is a two pack available for $47.76.

The 40 lb unit is also available via Amazon for $23.88 + Free Shipping with $35 order.  The 60 lb unit is selling for $53.82.

Gamma Vittles Vault Stackables - $23.88 + Free Shipping with $49 Order

Related:

Great Prices on Bags of Malt

Pinned: Chugger Pump · $19 Grain Scale · Hops from $10.49/lb · BoilerMaker G1

Ends Soon: Free EcoGrowler

Recent Great Deals:

Categories: Beer Blogosphere News

Ends Soon: Free EcoGrowler with $50 Purchase at Great Fermentations

Homebrew Finds - Mon, 10/13/2014 - 06:31

This sale is ending…

Spend $50 at Great Fermentations and get a free 64 Oz EcoGrowler!  To get the Growler… Add at least $50 to your cart, Add the EcoGrowler to your cart and apply promo/coupon code HBFECO.  As a bonus, you’ll still earn rewards points on the EcoGrowler even though it’s free.  This also bundles with Great Fermentations’ $8.99 Flat Rate Shipping.

Check it out - Here - Bundles with $8.99 Flat Rate Shipping

Some Items to Consider: Cosmetic Damage BoilerMaker G1 Kettles - Used 15 gallon Rye Whiskey Barrels - 5 Gallon Reconditioned Ball Lock Kegs - Beer Tower Cooler - LabelNator Label Remover - Big Little Guy Session IPA Extract and All Grain (Think Founder’s All Day IPA) – 1 HR IPA Extract and All Grain (Think 60 Minute IPA) - Patagonia Malts and Patagonia IPA Recipe via Juno Choi - Blichmann Replacement Parts

Pinned: $19 Grain Scale · Drink Tanks Growler · Hops from $10.49/lb · Pliny

Ending Soon: $10 Off $50 at MoreBeer… Save 20% · Beerloved Sale · $20 GC

Free EcoGrowler

More from Great Fermentations:

Great Fermentations Picks:

Categories: Beer Blogosphere News

Beer In Ads #1341: If You Want To Feel Heroic …

Brookston Beer Bulletin - Sun, 10/12/2014 - 21:53
Sunday’s ad is for Double Diamond, from the 1950s. Part of the Inde Cooper’s “Works Wonders” series, but I’m not sure this one was such a good idea. Suggesting that after a few beers, one might have the courage, and skill, to fight crime seems like a potential...

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Categories: Beer Blogosphere News

Beer Birthday: Luc De Raedemaeker

Brookston Beer Bulletin - Sun, 10/12/2014 - 15:39
Today is the 43rd birthday of Luc De Raedemaeker, who’s the Tasting Director for the Brussels Beer Challenge, and also the owner of BIERinhuis. I first met Luc in D.V. when Stephen Beaumont introduced us during CBC, and then we judged together in Japan last year. We’ve since run into...

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Categories: Beer Blogosphere News

Stainless Steel Center Inlet Chugger Pump – $129.99

Homebrew Finds - Sun, 10/12/2014 - 14:17

Adventures in Homebrewing has the center inlet, stainless Chugger Pump on sale for $129.99.

Details…

  • Model : Chugger SS-C
  • Chugger SS Center Inlet Pump 3/4″ Inlet x 1/2″ outlet.MPT
  • Add the optional reducer to make a 1/2″ FPT on the inlet port
  • 316 Stainless Steel (Front Housing), 316 Stainless Steel (Rear Housing), Teflon (Thrust Washer), CLEAR Silicone (O-Ring), POLYSULFONE (Impeller)
  • Max Flow 7 GPM 22.7 LPM
  • Max Head 18.6 FT 4.1 M
  • Power .04 HP .029 KW
  • Electrical 115V 50/60HZ
  • Non-Submersible
  • 60HZ 50HZ
  • Can handle liquids of 250F
  • Materials are FDA Food Compliant
  • Components are UL Recognized

Chugger Pump Stainless Steel-Center - $129.99

Also Consider: All Current Sale Items

Pinned: $19 Grain Scale · Drink Tanks Growler · Hops from $10.49/lb · Pliny

Ending Soon: $10 Off $50 at MoreBeer… Save 20% · Beerloved Sale · $20 GC

Free EcoGrowler

Recent AIH Finds:

AIH Picks:

Categories: Beer Blogosphere News

BeerSmith 2 – $18.99

Homebrew Finds - Sun, 10/12/2014 - 13:45

Product Description - Here.  Use coupon code BEERDEAL to get this discount.

For Comparison: This typically sells for $27.95.  Put together a $59 order and this ships for free.

BeerSmith Software 2.0 BK915 - $18.99 + Free Shipping with $59 Order

Availability: This is a More Beer Deal of the Day.  Quantities are limited. Check the Deal of the Day section Here - to see if this is still available.

Pinned: $19 Grain Scale · Drink Tanks Growler · Hops from $10.49/lb · Pliny

Ending Soon: $10 Off $50 at MoreBeer… Save 20% · Beerloved Sale · $20 GC

Free EcoGrowler

Limited Time…

To celebrate 50,000 likes on Facebook MoreBeer is offering $10 Off a $50 order when you use promo code THANKS50K.  For an exact $50 order, this is a 20% discount!

Check out our past featured MoreBeer Items and our MoreBeer Reviews

Quick Links: Kegs • Great Deal on PBW • Mini Keg Growler • Wort Chillers • Counter Pressure Bottle Filler • All Sale and Clearance Items • Hands On: Speidel Fermenters • Blichmann BoilerMaker G2 Kettles Available • Brewing Pliny the Elder • Free Shipping • BrewMaster Series - Pliny, Firestone Walker, Consecration & More

Recent More Beer Finds:

MoreBeer! Picks:

Categories: Beer Blogosphere News

Beer In Ads #1340: Saturday Afternoon At Sportsman’s Park

Brookston Beer Bulletin - Sat, 10/11/2014 - 21:02
Saturday’s ad is another one from the United Brewers Industrial Foundation, from 1945. This was the year before the “Beer Belongs” series began. These were similar, and used the “Beer Belongs” tagline, but were unnumbered stand-alones. They each featured a painting by...

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Categories: Beer Blogosphere News

Guest Post: Staying Warm this Winter – The Bloated Bagpipe Wee Heavy + Free EcoGrowler Offer

Homebrew Finds - Sat, 10/11/2014 - 14:00

Special Thanks to Wes via Great Fermentations for this post!

Hello everyone, and welcome again to Brew Along with Us! For this month’s recipe, I’m turning to a style that I felt would work well for the upcoming cool months: a strong Scotch ale, also commonly known as a wee heavy.

Wee heavies tend to be beers that are big on malt, higher in alcohol, and low on hops; having hopping rates that are just enough to balance the sweetness from the malt. They have an alcohol warmth that is present, but not overpowering. Many recipes can be, and have been, as simple as a good, rich Scottish pale ale malt used as the base, with a little dark roasted malt for color. However, modern Scottish breweries and home brewers tend to use a few specialty grains to round out the grain bill, making a more complex finished product. Water used in brewing wee heavy beers should be heavy in calcium and chloride but low in sulfates, in order to be balanced toward malt character.

The brewing process is a bit more complex than some of your easier ales. While a single infusion mash can be used, it is usually at a higher temperature, anywhere in the range from 154-158F. This makes a more dextrinous wort with a heavier body. Longer boiling times also can help concentrate sugars and slightly caramelize the wort, a feature of wee heavy ales. In fact, if you are feeling adventurous, you may take a gallon of the first runnings and reduce it by boiling until it is syrupy, then adding back to the main body of wort and continuing with the boil.

Hops aren’t a strong feature of wee heavies, so a simple bittering addition with a small flavor or aroma addition for complexity will suffice. Because Scotland does not grow hops commercially, English hops are most often used. In this case, I’m going with Fuggle hops.

Anyone who has tasted a good commercial example of a wee heavy knows that they are full of malt character and body without being over sweet. They also tend to be relatively clean, in spite of restrained low ester levels that should come off as darker fruits, such as plum and raisin. This profile comes from low ale fermentation temperatures, usually followed by a cold conditioning or cellaring period during which the beer ages and mellows. Brewing a wee heavy can be a lot like brewing a lager, but with a neutral ale strain that is tolerant of low temperature ranges. Wyeast’s Scottish Ale yeast is ideal in this respect. Yeast can be pitched relatively cool, around 55-60F, and allowed to rise a few degrees over the first few days. A cool fermentation is recommended, not exceeding 65F, and may last several weeks. In this recipe, I recommend a primary fermentation at 60F for three weeks, then cold conditioning at 35F-45F for six to twelve weeks. While it will be ready to drink after primary fermentation, the cold conditioning will allow the beer to mature and develop into something incredible.

Note that this recipe calls for a 90 minute boil, so adjust your volumes to make up for the extra water lost to evaporation. I would start out with 7.5 gallons pre-boil volume in order to get 5.5 gallons in the fermenter, but your mileage may vary.

There you have it! Give this wee heavy recipe a try, and give us some feedback to let us know what you think about it. Cheers!

The Bloated Bagpipe Wee Heavy Recipe (for final volume of 5.5 gallons)

Specs
Estimated O.G. = 1.094
Estimated F.G. = 1.025
Estimated ABV = 9.1%
Estimated bitterness = 25 IBUs

Grain Bill
17 lbs. Simpson’s Golden Promise malt
2 lbs. Avangard Munich malt
0.5 lb. Simpson’s Dark crystal malt
0.25 lb. Munton’s Black Patent Malt

Hops
1.5 oz. Fuggle hops (5.3% AA), added with 60 minutes left in the 90 minute boil
0.5 oz. Fuggle hops, added with 30 minutes left in the boil

Yeast
3 packs (or make an appropriate starter) Wyeast 1728XL Scottish ale yeast, or 2 packs Safale S-05 American ale yeast

Brewing Process

  • Perform a single infusion mash at 156F for 60 minutes. Drain and sparge to collect wort, then proceed with a 90 minute boil. If desired, take one gallon of the first runnings and boil it separately until it has reached a syrupy consistency, then add it back to the main volume of wort and continue with the boil.
  • Chill to 55 to 60F, pitch yeast and ferment for three weeks at 60F.
  • Once primary fermentation is complete, you may choose to bottle or keg directly, or perform a secondary fermentation. Either way, a cold conditioning or cellaring step is recommended in order to age the beer. If cold conditioning, do so at 35-45F for six t to twelve weeks before serving.

Extract Version: Replace the Golden Promise malt with 13.2 lbs (4 cans) of Munton’s Maris Otter light liquid malt extract, 1 lb of amber dry malt extract, and 1 lb of light dry malt extract. Steep the specialty grains (Munich malt, Simpson’s dark crystal, and black patent) at 150-155F for 30 minutes using a muslin grain bag. Remove the bag, allowing the grains to drain into the boil kettle. Turn off the flame and dissolve the extracts in the kettle. Turn the flame back on, bring to a boil and proceed as normal, boiling for 90 minutes total. You may wish to take 1 gallon of the wort and boil it down to a syrupy consistency, then add that back to the main volume of wort and proceed with the 90 minute boil, then follow procedure for chilling, pitching and conditioning as listed above.

About the Author Wes has had an intense interest in brewing craft beer for ages. His brother, a brewer at Hair of the Dog in Portland Oregon, as well as the head brewer at Alameda Brewhouse, a local brewpub, first introduced Wes to craft beer during summer trips to Oregon when he was younger. After graduating with a degree in Communication from Indiana University, Wes went to Korea to teach English. Unable to find a good beer in the country, Wes soon turned to home brewing to produce his much-loved ales. Upon returning to the states, his interest took off, and he continued brewing incessantly while taking biology and chemistry classes at IUPUI. As of 2014 he has been brewing for seven years. Known around Great Fermentations as a serial brewer, he produces a vast array of different beers, as well as wine, mead and cider.

More from Great Fermentations:

Categories: Beer Blogosphere News

Beer In Ads #1339: Harvest Time

Brookston Beer Bulletin - Fri, 10/10/2014 - 23:07
Friday’s ad is another one from the United Brewers Industrial Foundation, from 1945. This was the year before the “Beer Belongs” series began. These were similar, and used the “Beer Belongs” tagline, but were unnumbered stand-alones. They each featured a painting by a...

[[Click through to the Bulletin for full content]]
Categories: Beer Blogosphere News

Stone Brewing names Richmond Virginia as destination for $74 million East Coast hub

BeerPulse - Fri, 10/10/2014 - 18:31

NewsWire: 

(Escondido, CA) – San Diego-based Stone Brewing Co. announced it has signed a formal letter of intent with the City of Richmond, Virginia, signifying the company’s interest in building its East Coast facility in the city’s Greater Fulton Community. Subject to local approvals, Stone plans to invest $74 million to construct a production brewery, packaging hall, destination restaurant, retail store and its administrative offices. Construction of the facilities will occur in phases. The brewery is anticipated to be operational in late 2015 or early 2016, with Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens opening a year or two after that. Ultimately, the company will employ more than 288 people.

“The search for our location east of the Mississippi River was no easy endeavor,” said Stone President and Co-founder Steve Wagner. “We received and reviewed hundreds of proposals, visited more than 40 sites, and received quite a bit of attention from communities and craft beer fans. The three finalist cities each provided diverse offerings, however, we decided to begin next-step negotiations with Richmond because of their ability to meet our extensive site requirements, subject to the city’s approval. We also feel that Richmond’s vibrant energy and impressive craft beer culture, along with the uniqueness of the property, will allow us to create a truly memorable Stone experience for our fans. We are honored by the amount of time and effort all the communities that submitted proposals put forth, and we want to specifically thank Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe and Richmond Mayor Dwight C. Jones for welcoming us.”

Adds Stone CEO and Co-founder Greg Koch, “A facility on the East Coast will allow us to meet demand for our beer, ensure we are providing our fans with the freshest beer possible and also serve as a distribution hub for states located east of the Mississippi. We look forward to becoming an integral part of the lively craft beer community in Richmond, the state of Virginia and the entire eastern U.S.”

Stone anticipates building a 200,000 square-foot production brewery and distribution facility on 14 acres of land. Equipped with a 250-barrel brewhouse, the brewery will produce year-round and special-release beers to be bottled, kegged and distributed, as well as enjoyed on-site. The company also plans to renovate a two-story, 30,000 square-foot building, transforming it into a destination restaurant spanning four acres and highlighting locally grown organic food, complementing the harmonious nature and seasonality of the location’s surroundings. The restaurant will feature beautifully landscaped gardens where visitors will be able to enjoy craft beer, dine and relax in an inviting atmosphere.

“Today’s announcement marks the fruition of months of partnership and aggressive efforts to show Stone Brewing Co. that Virginia is the best state for its new craft beer production and hospitality facility,” said Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe. “The company received submissions from more than 20 states, and the Commonwealth of Virginia was selected. This competitive, high-profile project really puts Virginia on the map and cements our standing as a serious player in the craft beer industry. In addition to Stone’s significant investment and more than 288 new jobs, the far-reaching economic benefits of this operation are innumerable. The City of Richmond offers the infrastructure, available site and building, and natural resources that will allow the company to thrive and grow, and we are confident that Stone will benefit from the Commonwealth’s excellent business environment for years to come. Today is an achievement of great magnitude, and we are excited to welcome Stone Brewing Co. to Virginia.”

“We are thrilled about Stone’s decision to choose Richmond as its East Coast production and distribution facility location,” said Richmond Mayor Dwight C. Jones. “After competing with 20 other states, we are so pleased that Stone has discovered those attributes that make Richmond a great place to do business. The fact that they have chosen a site in the Greater Fulton Community underscores their understanding of the rich history and natural assets that we have to offer. As they bring their unique craft beer and visionary business model here, I look forward to the many opportunities that lay ahead with Stone.”

This is the second expansion announcement Stone has made this year. In July, the company unveiled it will become the first American craft brewer to independently own and operate a brewery in Europe with the opening of Stone Brewing Co. – Berlin.

 

 

Categories: Beer Blogosphere News

Stone Brewing names Richmond Virginia as destination for $74 million East Coast hub

BeerNews.org - Fri, 10/10/2014 - 18:31

NewsWire: 

(Escondido, CA) – San Diego-based Stone Brewing Co. announced it has signed a formal letter of intent with the City of Richmond, Virginia, signifying the company’s interest in building its East Coast facility in the city’s Greater Fulton Community. Subject to local approvals, Stone plans to invest $74 million to construct a production brewery, packaging hall, destination restaurant, retail store and its administrative offices. Construction of the facilities will occur in phases. The brewery is anticipated to be operational in late 2015 or early 2016, with Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens opening a year or two after that. Ultimately, the company will employ more than 288 people.

“The search for our location east of the Mississippi River was no easy endeavor,” said Stone President and Co-founder Steve Wagner. “We received and reviewed hundreds of proposals, visited more than 40 sites, and received quite a bit of attention from communities and craft beer fans. The three finalist cities each provided diverse offerings, however, we decided to begin next-step negotiations with Richmond because of their ability to meet our extensive site requirements, subject to the city’s approval. We also feel that Richmond’s vibrant energy and impressive craft beer culture, along with the uniqueness of the property, will allow us to create a truly memorable Stone experience for our fans. We are honored by the amount of time and effort all the communities that submitted proposals put forth, and we want to specifically thank Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe and Richmond Mayor Dwight C. Jones for welcoming us.”

Adds Stone CEO and Co-founder Greg Koch, “A facility on the East Coast will allow us to meet demand for our beer, ensure we are providing our fans with the freshest beer possible and also serve as a distribution hub for states located east of the Mississippi. We look forward to becoming an integral part of the lively craft beer community in Richmond, the state of Virginia and the entire eastern U.S.”

Stone anticipates building a 200,000 square-foot production brewery and distribution facility on 14 acres of land. Equipped with a 250-barrel brewhouse, the brewery will produce year-round and special-release beers to be bottled, kegged and distributed, as well as enjoyed on-site. The company also plans to renovate a two-story, 30,000 square-foot building, transforming it into a destination restaurant spanning four acres and highlighting locally grown organic food, complementing the harmonious nature and seasonality of the location’s surroundings. The restaurant will feature beautifully landscaped gardens where visitors will be able to enjoy craft beer, dine and relax in an inviting atmosphere.

“Today’s announcement marks the fruition of months of partnership and aggressive efforts to show Stone Brewing Co. that Virginia is the best state for its new craft beer production and hospitality facility,” said Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe. “The company received submissions from more than 20 states, and the Commonwealth of Virginia was selected. This competitive, high-profile project really puts Virginia on the map and cements our standing as a serious player in the craft beer industry. In addition to Stone’s significant investment and more than 288 new jobs, the far-reaching economic benefits of this operation are innumerable. The City of Richmond offers the infrastructure, available site and building, and natural resources that will allow the company to thrive and grow, and we are confident that Stone will benefit from the Commonwealth’s excellent business environment for years to come. Today is an achievement of great magnitude, and we are excited to welcome Stone Brewing Co. to Virginia.”

“We are thrilled about Stone’s decision to choose Richmond as its East Coast production and distribution facility location,” said Richmond Mayor Dwight C. Jones. “After competing with 20 other states, we are so pleased that Stone has discovered those attributes that make Richmond a great place to do business. The fact that they have chosen a site in the Greater Fulton Community underscores their understanding of the rich history and natural assets that we have to offer. As they bring their unique craft beer and visionary business model here, I look forward to the many opportunities that lay ahead with Stone.”

This is the second expansion announcement Stone has made this year. In July, the company unveiled it will become the first American craft brewer to independently own and operate a brewery in Europe with the opening of Stone Brewing Co. – Berlin.

 

 

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